Feeds:
Articoli
Commenti

Archive for gennaio 2010

1. Miss Kawauchi, your photos bring me into a world of quiet contemplation, your camera captures the most intricate details of every day life, transforming the ordinary into the extraordinary and revealing a lyrical rhythm to our daily lives and surroundings. Before I go into your motifs and motivation,may I start by asking you what cameras you use?

My favourite camera is the Rolleiflex. The reason why I like the Rolleiflex so much is because every aspect of it, the soft quality of the lens, the feeling of it in my hand, the clicking of the shutter, feels just right. But I also use normal compact cameras as well because some things can only be taken with a compact camera. I love that moment when I feel something and press the shutter.

2. Do you insist upon a certain kind of form of printing? For example, you often print your photos in a square format, is there a reason why?

The reason why I print in a square format is because the Rolleiflex camera which I use is a 6 x 6 camera. I dislike trimming photos because I when I take pictures I am taking them through a 6 x 6 lens and therefore from a 6 x 6 point of view. But I also really like the square format as it is a world that is neither vertical nor horizontal. Not being pulled by either feels like a world to me.

3. What do you actually like about photography?

I was comfortable with it the moment I held my first camera. Also, there is a kind of positive chemistry between me and taking photos …I think I really like the idea of cutting out a moment in time…it is almost like fulfilling a hunting instinct for me. By fulfilling this need I get a feeling of satisfaction. For example, I think its similar to going shopping, the feeling of going to get something is a really comfortable task and coming home and printing the images is very similar to cooking for me. This string of tasks is very important to my daily life.

4. You do commercial photography as well as your personal artwork. Can you tell us a little about the relationship between your work in an artistic and commercial context and about how you negotiate and deal with both.

At first I had been doing lots of commercial work, but my manager Mr. Takei encouraged me to spend more time on my artistic work. But it’s difficult to choose one or the other because if someone where to ask me whether I worl better without commissioned work, that is not always the case. On the other hand, doing too much commercial work is no good either.But for example, the work I am displaying at the Photographers Gallery now is what I worked on whilst I worked on commissions and when I look back on myself, I am really glad that I was able to take so much work side by side with my commercial work. If I were given lots of time to concentrate just on my artistic works, I don’t know if I could do it. So for me it is best when I balance out the job of being a commercial photographer and an artistic photographer.

5. I realized, that you take photos with your mobile phone, too for your online Rinko Diary you write! I find it extremely interesting to see a professional photographer taking photos on a mobile phone and presenting them to the public. Can you tell me a bit more about those photos and why you started the diary?

I thought taking photos with my mobile phone every day would be quite interesting, It’s a mobile phone camera and I am writing a diary, so I tried not to make it too artistic.Why I started it is because I really wanted to do something daily. Even more, I wanted it to be presented to others because doing something privately doesn’t ever last long, and going round in circles brings you back to the same place. I also thought that presenting it on the interenet would make it feel live.

6. And I heard that you are taking this diary further by publishing a book based on it! This also brings me to my next question: you have a prolific publishing career with 6 major beautiful titles and you tend to present a lot of your photography in book format. What exactly triggered your bookmaking career? Was it inspired by any special encounters?

My first photography book was published by Mr. Takei when he was still at Little More (He is now the president of Foil. Normally, publishing three books at once, especially photography books is completely unheard of, but he just did it and that was the begining.Books have always been like a friend to me from a very early age and when I spoke of my future dream in high school I said that, although I didn’t know exactly what kind of book it would be, I would publish a book in my own name one day.

7. What exactly do you like about the book format?

Movies and television offer you a form of time which is in a sense imposed upon you and which you can’t really move away from or control. But with books, you can take them around and look at any part of them at your own pace. This is why, I cant stand reading the same book with someone else. For example, I used to love the Shonen Jump Magazine when I was in elementary school and I hated it when my brother would try to read the comics while I did. I would say, “Stop interefering with my relationship with Dragonball!” (ha ha ha) I didn’t want anyone to interfere with the intimate world created between me and whatever I was reading. Books are such a big part of my life, they have helped me through a lot, and that is why I am so happy to be able to have a job where I can make books

8. Your books are collections of images often put together based on visual association and I find that these visual associations create space for engagement, curiosity, contemplation and imagination. How do you decide upon the composition of your books? How do you make your books flow so beautifully?

When I put together a book, I actually I have a conversation with myself. To be more specific, I begin by printing simply everything that I have recently taken and which interest me for what ever reason. And then I spread everything on my floor at home and start by taking an image in my hand. I then choose the next image, as if I were playing an image association game. I have moments where I say to myself, “I don’t know why but only this image can be next to this one”, or “this is a bit too well-coupled”. It’s almost like having some kind of discovery. In fact, photography is a succession of discoveries. When you take the photo you have a discovery. Then when you print you have another discovery. It is as if I am pressing the shutter a second time, because I notice things, I wasn’t aware before.

9. How did you cultivate your photographic/artistic sensibility?

People often say that I have a child’s eye. For example, I stare at ants gathering around sugar, or when I seek shelter from the rain, I gaze upon snails. These are things which you often do when you are a child aren’t they? I have a very similar sensibility to that.

I prefer listening to the small voices in our world, those which whisper. I have a feeling I am always being saved by these whispers, my eyes naturally focus on small things. Even when I walk around Shibuya, I find myself running towards a little batch of flowers. I find comfort in them. I think this is a very normal sensitivity, on the contrary to what people may think, I think its sound. But of course the world we live in is not only made up of grass growing by the road, it is composed by lots and lots of other elemets and so I do also take pictures of many other things. Just taking flowers is not interesting. I experience the world with a feeling of equilibrium and I think it shows in my works.

10. Finally, can you tell us about your next project? I heard you are working on an exhibition in Brazil?

I am holding an exhibition at a museum in San Paulo next year and I visited Brazil in February to take photos for the exhibition. The owner of a Contemporary Art Museum in Brazil suggested that I took pictures of Japanese immigrants in a study of the history of Japanese immigrantion. I am thinking of going back again in the summer and making a book out of the idea!

I really look forward to that!

(PingMag)

Annunci

Read Full Post »

THE BOSNIAN IDENTITY

Fotografie di Matteo Bastianelli

Inaugurazione a Roma sabato 16 gennaio ore 18 a seguire l’incontro con l’autore. Una mostra organizzata da Officine Fotografiche, in collaborazione con Marta Dahò (curatrice progetti espositivi).

Un orologio, un paio di occhiali, un pettine. Tutti oggetti identitari ritrovati nelle fosse comuni che riconducono a vite spezzate, rimaste senza un nome e una degna sepoltura. Matteo Bastianelli attraverso luoghi, persone e oggetti ha tracciato la triste realtà delle identità perse negli anni del conflitto serbo-bosniaco. Un passato ancora tangibile nel presente che il tempo e la memoria non ha cancellato.

Teatro agli inizi degli anni Novanta di un conflitto interetnico e interreligioso tra musulmani, ortodossi e cattolici, la Bosnia a quindici anni dalla fine del conflitto è un Paese in cui le ferite sono rimaste aperte. Il costo in vite umane, nell’ex Jugoslavia tuttora non è definito: mancano all’appello 30.000 esseri umani, scomparsi nella furia omicida. Grazie al lavoro dell’International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) di Sarajevo, su tutto il territorio della Bosnia Erzegovina ancora oggi vengono ritrovati oggetti e corpi a cui spesso è difficile restituire un nome e un’identità. Matteo Bastianelli attraverso le città di Cerska, Srebrenica, Tuzla, Mostar e Sarajevo ha ricostruito questa storia dell’orrore. Il suo lavoro ha dato vita a The Bosnian Identity (L’identità della Bosnia), una selezione di fotografie tratte dal lungo reportage realizzato a più riprese tra Bosnia e Repubblica Srpska. «Questo lavoro – spiega l’autore – è nato grazie al volontariato. Il primo viaggio mi ha segnato profondamente. Raccogliendo le storie e i ricordi di più di settanta famiglie, conosciute attraverso un progetto di adozione a distanza dall’Italia, promosso dalla Fondazione Onlus “Il Giardino delle Rose Blu”, un’associazione che alterna campi e progetti di volontariato in alcune aree dei Balcani». The Bosnian Identity nasce come contributo di commemorazione nei confronti delle vittime scomparse e come omaggio all’affettuosa accoglienza della popolazione bosniaca. Al bianco e nero delle immagini, si alternano ombre che ricalcano luoghi, persone e avvenimenti, spesso inquietanti fino all’angoscia. L’anteprima di una parte del lavoro sarà presentata il 16 gennaio a Officine Fotografiche. Una mostra che vedrà come ultima tappa naturale, proprio Sarajevo. Coniugando l’esperienza umana a quella professionale Matteo Bastianelli è riuscito a entrare con discrezione in una realtà mai scontata e superficiale. Il giovane fotoreporter da questa esperienza bella e sconvolgente non ha solo ricostruito la triste realtà delle identità perse. Le sue immagini rievocano un passato ancora tangibile nel presente che il tempo e la memoria non hanno cancellato. Luci e ombre fotografiche non schiariscono il racconto drammatico di un popolo che ha vissuto la crudeltà di una guerra senza senso, ma quanto meno ricostruiscono frammenti di vita, di luoghi e persone le cui sorti sono, ancora oggi, avvolte dal mistero.

La mostra organizzata da Officine Fotografiche è stata prodotta con il contributo di Interno Grigio di Daniele Coralli, con la collaborazione di Marta Dahò curatrice progetti espositivi e con Fondazione Internazionale Onlus “Il giardino delle rose blu”. Matteo Bastianelli, nato nel 1985 a Velletri (Roma), è fotografo freelance e giornalista. Dopo la maturità scientifica ha frequentato la Scuola Romana di Fotografia. Attualmente sta realizzando diversi progetti a lungo termine sulla condizione di vita dei senzatetto, sui centri sociali della Capitale, sul sistema sanitario in Croazia e sul genocidio operato dai serbi nei confronti dei musulmano- bosniaci tra Cerska, Srebrenica, Tuzla, Mostar e Sarajevo. Le sue immagini sono state pubblicate su alcuni dei maggiori quotidiani nazionali, tra cui Il Messaggero, Il Corriere della Sera e Liberazione.

La mostra verrà inaugurata sabato 16 gennaio dalle ore 18.00
Durerà fino al 3 febbraio 2010
Dal lunedì al venerdì dalle 16.00 alle 19.30
Presso: Officine Fotografiche Ass.ne Culturale
Via Casale de Merode 17/a – 00147 Roma
Tel. +39 06 5125019

http://www.officinefotografiche.org/

Read Full Post »

Andreas Gursky, Hamm, Brgwerk ost’, 2008

Andreas Gursky, Hamm, Brgwerk ost’, 2008

Andreas Gursky:

Lavoro sull’enciclopedia della vita.

Sono impegnato in un approccio idealizzato ai fenomeni della quotidianeità – per produrre l’essenza della realtà.

La realtà può essere mostrata solo se costruita.

Le mie immagini sono sempre composte da due punti di vista. Da un punto di vista estremamente ravvicinato sono leggibili fino all’ultimo dettaglio. Da lontano si trasformano in mega segni.

Compongo le immagini, non idealizzo nulla.

Le fotografie sono autorizzate a mentire.

Mi interessa il potere della suggestione.

Mi interessano le prospettive globali, con le utopie sociali di oggi.

(Fonti: “Stern”, n.6, 2007; “Spiegel, n.4, 2007; “Suddeutsche Zeitung”, 26 gennaio 2007)

Andreas Gursky, May Day V, 2006

Andreas Gursky, May Day V, 2006

Andreas Gursky, Rimini, 1999

Andreas Gursky, Rimini, 1999

Andreas Gursky, Borsa, 2000

Andreas Gursky, Borsa, 2000

Andreas Gursky, 99 cent, 1999

Andreas Gursky, 99 cent, 1999

Andreas Gursky, Kamiokande, 2007

Andreas Gursky, Kamiokande, 2007

Andreas Gursky, Copan, 2001

Andreas Gursky, Copan, 2001

Read Full Post »

Juliana Beasley, Last stop dinner, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Last stop dinner, 2009

Ci deve essere un momento, per certe persone intendo, in cui tutto va in pezzi. Deve essere un momento qualsiasi, una mattina qualunque. Tu magari neanche minimamente ci pensavi che poteva andare a finire male e poi Bum, tutto se ne va in frantumi. Deve fare un rumore strano e a dirla tutta neanche penso che faccia veramente un rumore. Ma sono sicuro che se uno potesse sentirla, quella cosa lì, sarebbe molto simile a queste fotografie.

Ci deve essere un momento, per certe persone, in cui sei liberamente portato a mandare a ‘fanculo il mondo intero e iniziare a ballare una specie di danza anarchica partorita esclusivamente dalla tua mente.

La serie di fotografie di Juliana Beasley racconta un pezzo sperduto di New York e la sua stretta comunità. Emarginati, individui con seri problemi di salute mentale (per alcuni alle spalle) e disperati si sono riuniti, esiliandosi, in un’angolo di strada dimenticato del distretto di Queens (il più popolato dopo Brooklyn) rinominato dagli stessi abitanti: THE LAST STOP – ROCKAWAY PARK.

Siamo solo a circa venti miglia da Manhattan, ma quello che traspare da queste fotografie è che Rockaway Park è un mondo a sè. Un paese con rotte e spazi diversi. Una cosa che all’inizio non smetti di chiederti se esiste da lì dentro una via di fuga, consolatorio, se capisci che quell’intero posto è già una via di fuga. E se lo capisci, allora non c’è più paura e tutti i personaggi di queste foto ti sembreranno dannatamente normali.

Succede che ci inizi anche a vedere un nuovo modo di stare al mondo, magari diverso questo si, ma pur sempre un modo. Che è già qualcosa. Allora smetti di soffermarti sulla miseria, sulle follie di queste persone e sulle loro luride cose – così distanti anche se familiari – e cominci a intravederci dei gesti: piccole traiettorie tese a fendere feritoie per non scomparire del tutto. Per continuare ad esserci.

Forse non c’entra nulla ma queste fotografie mi fanno venire in mente un racconto scritto da Raymond Carver. Si chiama Perchè non ballate? Parla, tra le altre cose, di un uomo che beve whisky e se ne sta seduto in giardino. Solo che in quel giardino ha riversato gran parte della sua casa: i mobili della camera da letto (di lui e di sua moglie), il materasso, i lenzuoli, l’abat-jour, il giradischi e i mobili della cucina, ad occupare il vialetto. Una mattina aveva svuotato i cassetti e portato in giardino tutte quelle cose. Aveva anche comperato degli scatoloni per metterci dentro quella roba e una prolunga, in modo che tutti gli elettrodomestici in giardino fossero attaccati alla corrente.

Tutto era in vendita.

Succedeva che ogni tanto qualcuno rallentava la macchina, per godersi lo spettacolo ma mai nessuno si fermava. Un giorno passa di lì una coppia di ragazzi. Lei incuriosita, convince lui ad andare a dare un’occhiata. Sono giovani e stanno arredando un loro piccolo appartamento. Chiedono prezzi, indicano cose, l’uomo risponde educatamente.

Provano il letto. Abbiamo bisogno di un letto, dice lei.

E il televisore?, chiede il ragazzo.

Venticinque, risponde l’uomo.

Vanno bene quindici?

Quindici vanno benone. Posso accettarne anche quindici, dice l’uomo.

E così va a finire che chiedono un sacco di prezzi e decidono di comprare un mucchio di roba. Anche il letto, alla fine. C’è addirittura una scena abbastanza patetica in cui quei due si baciano lì sopra, proprio davanti all’uomo.

A un certo punto si ritrovano tutti e tre a bere seduti attorno ad un tavolo (in vendita) in giardino, con la luce delle lampadine a filo ad illuminarli. L’uomo mette un disco dietro l’altro poi chiede ai ragazzi: perchè non ballate?. I ragazzi non ci pensano nemmeno a farlo, ma poi pensano, Perchè no?

Va a finire che ballano quei due, abbracciati stretti, fino alla fine del disco.

Allora l’uomo ne mette su un altro.

Balla con me, dice la ragazza al ragazzo e poi all’uomo.

C’è della gente che ci guarda, dice lei.

E’ tutto a posto, dice l’uomo, Questa è casa mia.

Allora succede una cosa strana, la ragazza spinge ancora più a sè l’uomo e gli dice:

Lei dev’essere disperato o qualcosa del genere.

La ragazza non capiva, la disperazione non c’entra più nulla a quel punto. Sono gesti. Piccole traiettorie tese a fendere feritoie per non scomparire del tutto. Per continuare ad esserci.

Valerio Cappabianca

Juliana Beasley, Butchie Under Covers, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Butchie Under Covers, 2009

Juliana Beasley, John Trainer #1, 2009

Juliana Beasley, John Trainer #1, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Glamorous Isabelle, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Glamorous Isabelle, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Harry, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Harry, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Charlie Cowboy, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Charlie Cowboy, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Mae and Mattress, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Mae and Mattress, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Seamus’ Ball, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Seamus’ Ball, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Paddy Mid-Day Afternoon Nap, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Paddy Mid-Day Afternoon Nap, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Frieda, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Frieda, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Trailer Bob, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Trailer Bob, 2009

Juliana Beasley,Fishbowl, 2009

Juliana Beasley, Fishbowl, 2009

Read Full Post »

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

«Non gl’immobili fantocci del Presepio; e nemmeno ombre in movimento. Non sono teatro le pellicole fotografiche che, elaborate una volta per sempre fuor dalla vista del pubblico, e definitivamente affidate a una macchina come quella del Cinema, potranno esser proiettate sopra uno schermo, tutte le volte che si vorrà, sempre identiche, inalterabili e insensibili alla presenza di chi le vedrà. Il Teatro vuole l’attore vivo, e che parla e che agisce scaldandosi al fiato del pubblico; vuole lo spettacolo senza la quarta parete, che ogni volta rinasce, rivive o rimuore fortificato dal consenso, o combattuto dalla ostilità, degli uditori partecipi, e in qualche modo collaboratori.»

(Silvio D’Amico, Storia del teatro)

La fotografia perviene all’arte attraverso il teatro.

(Roland Barthes, La Camera Chiara)


La particolare arte del rappresentare una storia tramite un testo o azioni sceniche è la recitazione, o arte drammatica che dir si voglia. A ben guardare, in molte lingue come nel francese (jouer), l’inglese (to play), il tedesco (spielen) e nelle lingue nordiche il verbo “recitare” coincide col verbo “giocare”. La serie fotografica Actors, eseguita dal fotografo polacco Adam Panczuk tra il 2005 e il 2006 è sicuramente molto legata a questo primario ed al contempo imprenscindibile assunto.

Come molte delle serie dell’autore anche questa mira a descrivere trasformazioni e tradizioni del territorio polacco. Panczuk è solito costruire i propri lavori fotografici come dei veri e propri saggi. In questo ricorda molto uno spirito, poi incarnato da molti, riconducibile abbastanza spontaneamente all’occhio cristallino di Paul Strand, dove l’approccio sociale alla realtà potrebbe essere definito documentaristico o neorealista, senza comunque privarsi dell’aspetto pittoresco e poetico nascosto dietro agli eventi. Si ha quasi la sensazione -osservando il lavoro di Panczuk  – che le storie di intere vite si siano prepotentemente intruse nel momento dello scatto. Questo confluisce al suo lavoro un aspetto totemico, quasi animalesco.

Gli scatti portano con sè il peso di alcune – ormai oggi scomode – riflessioni: sulla relazione tra esseri umani e natura, sul significato dell’umanità in relazione con la terra e le stagioni, sulla nascita di elementi inseparabili e sulla caducità.

Actors registra momenti delle performance di alcuni attori amatoriali della compagnia teatrale popolare Czeladonka che ha sede a Lubenka (città vicino al confine tra Polonia e Bielorussia). La compagnia è solita recitare scene basate su riti e tradizioni tramandate da generazioni. Gli attori sono principalmente contadini, i quali lavorano nei campi durante il giorno e solo alla sera dedicano del tempo alla recita. Spesso gli spettacoli sono rappresentati da intere famiglie, talvolta addirittura si arriva a portare sulla scena più di tre generazioni. Le recite si svolgono interamente all’aperto, in differenti parti della città. E’ il pubblico a seguire gli attori nei diversi luoghi mentre questi si muovono con il palco.

Se si guardano le foto che compongono la raccolta c’è subito una dualità che salta all’occhio. Da una parte, siamo investiti da un senso di stabilità, verrebbe quasi da dire di saldezza. E’ la storicità, l’impressione folgorante del peso della durata che trova la propria materializzazione nel frangente dello scatto. Una storicità incarnata dalla fermezza di volti pieni di valore morale. Dall’altra siamo invece investiti da una precarietà. Gli interi set degli spettacoli sembrano costruiti sul nulla, come se presto tutto fosse destinato a scomparire, ad essere spazzato via. E’ su questo equilibrio paradossale che queste fotografie riescono a colpire l’osservatore.

E lo fanno vincendo una scommessa. Quella che non vede l’istante opposto all’eternità, il teatro opposto alla fotografia. Lo fanno fermando un carosello precario in mezzo al niente e permettendogli di raccontare delle storie. Le loro.

Valerio Cappabianca

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Adam Panczuk, Actors, 2005/06

Read Full Post »